I AND THOU

Martin Luther King Jr had a dream; Ali made it a reality… he lost his world heavyweight title and won the whole world with his belief, charisma, and policy…

Is Mama Africa’s cooking nice?

This is a man’s world, this is a woman’s world, but it would be nothing, nothing without any plant or animal. You see man made restaurants for us to dine in; we made alcohol to get us through stress and for pleasure. We made cloths to keep us warm; we made houses for shelter, like birds make their nest. It is really a man’s and a woman’s world, but it would be nothing, nothing without meat, dairy products and vegetables or grains.

The African Mohammed Alis

In a world where we seek to dominate each other, exploit one another, and where there is the desire to better oneself by any means, it is of little surprise that most of our favourite sports originate from these basics fundamentals of life.

2005-2015: Je suis

In his book “Je suis”, Bakary puts the blame on the institutions; but not only. What makes his message quite unusual is obviously that the responsibility and ineffectiveness of the people from the suburbs and deprived districts of the Paris region, is not spared …

Islam and Politics in France

The assimilationist campaigns from the colonial and imperialist eras have finally led to the permanent establishment of a French Muslim community whose presence and cultural expression is now perceived as challenging French cultural identity and values. In May this year, France was once again pointed out and condemned by the UN for its political stances that aim at curtailing the cultural expression of its ethnic minorities and particularly the Muslims. “What are the origins of the islamophobic positions held by French politicians and the mass media?” What are the political decisions that finally led to a form of “apartheid” opposing those who define themselves as “Charlies” against those who do not?”
Here are some interesting questions that this essay will have the opportunity to discuss.

What « Exhibit B » taught us in France

Unlike their White counterparts, Black artists and creators are scarcely – not to say ‘never’ – given the possibility to use public funds to tell the stories experienced by their people through slavery and colonization. In other words, the black man’s story still remains a Whiteman’s tale.

What the death of Remy Fraisse teaches us

Police violence, in France today, seems to be only perceived as a serious issue when the victims are whites; just like in 1939-1945, when the whole world suddenly became conscious of the devastating consequences of racial and racist theories after some white people had for the very first time experienced what they usually and commonly inflicted to black and brown people.